History Day Competition


   

Theme:    Taking a Stand        (2017)

 When researching, keep the following in mind:

time & place (historical context),
 
cause & effect,
 
change over time,
 
historical impact & significance.
 
 
       Also>> How did this topic effect individuals, communities, nations and the world? (NHD Theme)

NOTE: Work on including Taking A Standas words  in the title.
 
Also, consider changing the topic into the form of a question which your research will answer.                                                   
....................................................................................................................................................
 
 
                                                        


Be sure to include primary sources.

See me Tues. or Wed.
after school if you need help.



................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................


                                                                                                                              It’s time to make history…
                                               
                                                     HISTORY DAY PROJECT
                                         

          This year’s theme is the following: Taking a Stand.

Each year a broad theme is selected for the History Day contest. Students may select a topic on any aspect of history that adheres to our curriculum.
 
They may enter one of six categories: paper (individual only), individual exhibit, individual performance, group performance,
 
individual documentary, or individual website. Information on the topic and detailed rules at: http://www.historyday.org.
 
                                         Visit this site and become familiar with it.

Summary: Students, individually or in a team of two, research an event or person who meet criteria of the annual History Day theme,

then prepare an exhibit, media documentary, performance, website, or historical  research paper that meet the History Day requirements.

Each student or group must make a 5-10 minute presentation of their completed project to their teacher and class. The best projects will

then be entered into the local History Day Competition.

The Big Idea:

History Day is an exciting, history-based learning experience for students who not only learn about issues, ideas, people and events in history,

 but they apply what they have learned through creative and original productions. Beyond simply memorizing names and dates and reporting

on historical events, History Day students develop invaluable research and analytical skills as they process the information gathered through

intensive research and draw their own conclusions about their topic's significance in history.

Resources/Materials:

Textbook, other resource books (access to library), internet (reliable sources) not ‘wikipedia’

Strive to attain as many primary sources as you can; this will authenticate your mission.

                                             Stay tuned for more information.      

                                                    Today’s news is tomorrow’s history.

................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

See below...

Student Handout #1

 

Task: History Day Project.

Your assignment is to create a History Day project. You may select a topic of historical significance that encompasses our curriculum. Regardless of the topic chosen, the presentation of your research and conclusions must clearly relate to the annual theme. Be careful to limit the scope of your topic to make the research and interpretation of your topic manageable. In other words, narrow your topic to focus on an issue that can be explained and interpreted within the category limits of size and time.

A. Topics

Effective History Day entries not only describe an event or a development, they also analyze it and place it in its historical context. Ask yourself the following questions about your topic:

How is my topic important?

How was my topic significant in history in relation to the History Day theme?

How did my topic develop over time?

How did my topic influence history?

How did the events and atmosphere (social, economic, political, and cultural aspects) of my topic's time period influence my topic in history?

B. Contest Categories

You may enter one of six categories:

paper (individual only)

individual exhibit

individual performance

group performance*

individual documentary

individual website

NOTE: Each category in each division is judged separately.

* Performance groups may include 2 students maximum.

- Group participants have to be in the same grade & class to compete together.

 

C. Important Definitions

Plagiarism:

Plagiarism is using the work or ideas of others in ways that give the impression that these are your own (e.g. copying information word-for-word without using quotations and footnotes, paraphrasing an author's ideas, or using visuals or music without giving proper credit.)

Primary Sources:

Primary sources are materials directly related to a topic by time or participation. These materials include letters, speeches, diaries, newspaper articles from the time, oral history interviews, documents, photographs, artifacts, or anything else that provides first-hand accounts about a person or event. An interview with an expert (a professor of Civil War history, for example) is not a primary source. Quotes from historical figures in secondary sources are not considered primary.

Secondary Sources:

Secondary sources are usually published books or articles by authors who base their interpretation on primary sources.

 

D. Task Summary:

The Class Presentation.

After completion of your History Day project you will either individually or in your group make a 5-10 minute presentation of your project. Your presentation should address the following items:

Name your subject and introduce yourself (and group).

Explain the reasons why you chose your subject and how you felt it tied in to the History Day theme.

Explain your research strategies and your successes and failures.

Explain how you organized your exhibit, documentary, performance, or paper, or website.

What information did you find about your subject and what conclusion about the information did you reach as a result of your research.

Use the following format as a guideline: introduction (including thesis statement), historical context, the event, historical impact, conclusion.

 

Student Handout #2

How Will Your Entry To History Day Be Judged?

 

 

Judging Criteria

Historical Quality (60%)

The most important aspect of your entry is its historical quality. You should ask yourself the following questions to help you focus on your historical analysis:

Is my entry historically accurate?

Does my entry provide analysis and interpretation of the historical data rather than just a description?

Does my entry demonstrate an understanding of the historical context?

Does my annotated bibliography demonstrate wide research?

Does my entry demonstrate a balanced presentation of materials?

Does my entry demonstrate use of available primary sources?


Clarity of Presentation (20%)

Although historical quality is most important, your entry must be presented in an effective manner. You should ask yourself the following questions to help you focus on your presentation:

Is my entry original, creative, and imaginative in subject and presentation?

Is my written material clear, grammatical, and correctly spelled?

Do I display stage presence in a performance?

Is the visual material I present clear?

Do I understand and properly use all my equipment?

Relationship to Theme (20%)

Your entry must clearly explain the relation of your topic to the annual History Day theme. You should ask yourself the following questions to help you focus your topic on the theme and its significance:

How does my topic relate to the theme? Why is my topic important?

How is my topic significant in history in relation to the History Day theme?

How did my topic influence history?

How did the events and atmosphere (social, economic, political, and cultural aspects) of my topic's time period influence my topic in history?

 

Student Handout #3

 

Exhibit Category

Student Checklist

 

 

Individual Only

No larger than 40 inches wide, 30 inches deep, and 6 feet high when displayed.

3 copies (plus one for you) of written materials

Title page with required information

500 word description of the research methods used (A judging team may retain one copy for review.)

Annotated bibliography, separated into primary and secondary sources.

Exhibit addresses the theme.

Title is clear and visible.

Labels, captions, and titles include no more than 500 words.

Has visual impact and shows interpretation.

Names and addresses of all group participants listed on entry card.

Entry card and fee mailed by deadline.

Prepared to answer judges' questions at the contest (Remember that formal narratives are not appropriate responses to questions.).

 

 

 

Historical Paper Category

Student Checklist

 

 

Individual Only.

1,500-2,500 words, excluding notes, annotated bibliography, and title page.

Title page with only the required information.

Annotated bibliography, separated into primary and secondary sources.

Paper addresses the theme.

Citations.

4 copies (plus one for you).

Organization shows clear focus and progression.

Entry card, papers, and fee mailed by deadline.

Prepared to answer judges' questions at the contest (Remember that formal narratives are not appropriate responses to questions.)

 

 

Student Handout #4

 

Performance Category

Student Checklist

 

 

Individual or Group (2 students).

10 minute maximum for performance.

Maximum 5 minutes to set up and 5 minutes to take down.

3 copies (plus one for you) of written materials: title page with required information.

500 word description of the research methods used (A judging team may retain one copy for review.).

Annotated bibliography, separated into primary and secondary sources.

Performance addresses the theme.

All props and equipment are student supplied.

Only student entrants run equipment and are involved in the performance.

Extra supplies and materials in case of emergency.

Names and addresses of all group participants listed on entry card.

Entry card and fee mailed by deadline.

Prepared to answer judges' questions at the contest (Remember that formal narratives are not appropriate responses to questions.).

 

 

 

Documentary Category

Student Check List

 

 

Individual Only

10 minute maximum for presentation

Maximum 5 minutes to set up and 5 minutes to take down.

3 copies (plus one for you) of written materials.

title page with required information.

500 word description of the research methods used (A judging team may retain one copy for review.)

Annotated bibliography, separated into primary and secondary sources.

Documentary addresses the theme.

Live student involvement limited to giving name and title and operating equipment.

Names and addresses of all group participants listed on entry card.

Entry card and fee mailed by deadline.

Extra supplies and materials in case of emergency .

Prepared to answer judges questions at the contest ( Remember that formal narratives are not appropriate responses to questions.)

 

History Day Presentation Evaluation Sheet

Topic: ________________

Group Members:

_____________________

__________________________

Group Number: ____

__________________________

Period: ________

__________________________

Date: ________

__________________________

__________________________

 

 

Group Presentation – 50 points

Point Spread

Points Earned

Engages audience attention

0-10 points

Evidence of Rehearsal

0-10 points

Accuracy of the information

0-10 points

Posture/eye contact

0-10 points

Did all members participate?

5 points

Did the presentation meet the time criteria

Time Begun: ______

Time Ended: ______

10 points

Total points earned in this section

History Day Project – 150 points

Point Spread

Points Earned

Historical Quality

0-80 points

Clarity of Presentation

0-25 points

Relationship to Theme

0-25 points

Over-all Appearance

0-20 points

Total points earned in this section

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                      

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Standards Addressed:

 

NHD Connections to Common Core Standards: Middle School

 

 

National History Day in Wisconsin: Fall 2011

 

The National History Day program has been designed to assist teachers and schools in meeting educational standards. The NHD program and the nature of historical research bring together the language arts skills of reading, writing, and communication with the specific methods of historical inquiry. Students who successfully complete National History Day projects will likely address many of the following standards:

 

 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS

 

 

 

READING INFORMATIONAL TEXT

 

 

Students working with NHD will do extensive research in a variety of source types. Through this process theywill learn to read and analyze text.

 

RI.6-8.1. Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

RI.6-8.2. Determine a central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments.

RI.6-8.3. Analyze in detail how a key individual, event, or idea is introduced, illustrated, and elaborated in a text (e.g., through examples or anecdotes).

RI.6-8.7. Integrate information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words to develop a coherent understanding of a topic or issue.

RI.6-8.8. Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, distinguishing claims that are supported by reasons and evidence from claims that are not.

RI.6-8.9. Compare and contrast one author’s presentation of events with that of another (e.g., a memoir written by and a biography on the same person

 

 

WRITING

 

 

A main component of NHD is research and in all categories students develop arguments. Depending on the final product, students will write exhibit or website text, papers, or scripts for documentaries and performances to explain and support their argument. The NHD competitive cycle provides opportunities to revise and edit work.

 

W.6-8.1. Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence.

o Introduce claim(s) and organize the reasons and evidence clearly.

o Support claim(s) with clear reasons and relevant evidence, using credible sources and demonstrating an

 

 

understanding of the topic or text.

 

o Use words, phrases, and clauses to clarify the relationships among claim(s) and reasons.

o Establish and maintain a formal style.

o Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from the argument presented.

W.6-8.2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information

 

 

through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.

 

W.6-8.4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

W.8.5. With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been addressed.

W.8.7. Conduct short research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question), drawing on several sources and generating additional related, focused questions that allow for multiple avenues of

 

 

exploration.

 

W.6-8.8. Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources; assess the credibility of each source; and quote or paraphrase the data and conclusions of others while avoiding plagiarism and providing basic bibliographic information for sources.

 

 

SPEAKING & LISTENING

 

 

Creating a final product for NHD provides additional opportunities to meet these standards.

 

SL.8.2. Analyze the purpose of information presented in diverse media and formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) and evaluate the motives (e.g., social, commercial, political) behind its presentation.

SL.6-8.4. Present claims and findings, sequencing ideas logically and using pertinent descriptions, facts, and details to accentuate main ideas or themes; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear

 

 

pronunciation.

 

SL.6-8.5. Include multimedia components (e.g., graphics, images, music, sound) and visual displays in

 

presentations to clarify information.

 

 

 

 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS/HISTORY & SOCIAL STUDIES

 

 

Students working with NHD will do extensive research in a variety of source types. Through this process theywill learn to read and analyze text.

 

RH.6-8.1. Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources.

RH.6-8.2. Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate

 

 

summary of the source distinct from prior knowledge or opinions.

 

RH.6-8.7. Integrate visual information (e.g., in charts, graphs, photographs, videos, or maps) with other

 

 

information in print and digital texts.

 

RH.6-8.8. Distinguish among fact, opinion, and reasoned judgment in a text.

RH.6-8.9. Analyze the relationship between a primary and secondary source on the same topic.

 

 

WRITING

 

 

A main component of NHD is research and in all categories students develop arguments. Depending on the fina product, students will write exhibit or website text, papers, or scripts for documentaries and performances to explain and support their argument. The NHD competitive cycle provides a built in opportunity to revise and edittheir work.

 

WHST.6-8.1. Write arguments focused on discipline-specific content.

WHST.6-8.2. Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/experiments, or technical processes.

WHST.6-8.4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are

 

 

appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

 

WHST.6-8.5. With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been addressed.

WHST.6-8.6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and present the relationships between information and ideas clearly and efficiently.

WHST.6-8.7. Conduct short research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question), drawing on several sources and generating additional related, focused questions that allow for multiple avenues of exploration.

WHST.6-8.8. Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, using search terms effectively; assess the credibility and accuracy of each source; and quote or paraphrase the data and conclusions of others while avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation.

WHST.6-8.9. Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis reflection, and research

 

 

National History Day and Disciplinary Literacy

 

 

National History Day is an authentic opportunity to learn and practice disciplinary literacy in the social studies

classroom. As a student-directed research project, National History Day allows students to apply research, analysis, critical thinking, and presentation skills in a meaningful way. Students are engaged in thinking critically about a subject as they bring together history content knowledge with skills of investigation and interpretation. This rich learning experience motivates and engages students as they think critically about their research topic and the discipline of history. Through National History Day, students will:

 

Establish a purpose for their research by selecting their own topic connected to an annual theme.

 

 

 

 

Students will develop research questions to motivate and direct their investigation.

 

Investigate and analyze critical texts related to their topic.

Synthesize across these texts as they develop and support their thesis.

Communicate their analysis through spoken and written elements of a project.

Present and discuss their scholarship within a discipline literate community at competitive events.

Revise their project and ideas based on feedback.

 

 

Theme:    Leaders & Legacies 2014

 

When researching, keep the following in mind: time & place (historical context), cause & effect, change over time, historical impact & significance. Also, how did this topic effect individuals, communities, nations and the world. (NHD Theme)

NOTE: When finalizing topic title, be sure to narrow your scope to a specific historical event and include “Leaders & Legacy” as words in the title. Also, consider changing the topic into the form of a question which your research will answer.

 

                    

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Comments